Posted by: akjournalist | October 26, 2007

Remote Controlled Hunting on the Internet

OK, here’s the scenario. A physically challenged hunter, unable to leave the confines of home, is monitoring a computer screen waiting for a certain size or type of game animal to appear. Out of a clump of brush an antelope creeps in to view and ambles across an open area. The hunter uses his mouse to place a cross hair just aft of the antelopes shoulder and activates a trigger mechanism. Some untold distance away a professional hunter, or guide, has placed a loaded firearm into a specially designed mount that allows him an overview of the hunter’s sight picture and cross hair placement. The guide has override control of the situation and can prevent an unsafe shot from occurring. The guide can also finish off a wounded animal should the hunter’s shot not provide a quick kill. After successfully bagging the quarry the remote hunter’s animal is processed and shipped to his residence or donated to a local food bank.

 

This was the idea a Texas hunter, John Lockwood, conceived the first time he observed deer with a webcam. Supposedly Lockwood actually got the idea to work but the Texas Legislature put a halt to such methods and made remote controlled hunting illegal.

Several states have followed suite and passed similar laws, even the great state of Alaska didn’t miss out on the opportunity to prevent such perceived injustice.

Two bills have been introduced to make internet hunting a federal crime, H.R 2711 and H.R. 1558. There seems to be a general consensus that this type of hunting would lead to a wholesale killing on animals in pens, with nearly zero chance of failure and no real hunting involved.

 

I disagree. The practice would need to be regulated to allow some sort of fair chase but I believe disabled hunters could benefit from this type of hunting.

 

Next up: remote controlled fishing.

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